A Survey of Schools in Juba, South Sudan by David Longfield and James Tooley, E.G. West Centre, Newcastle University and Nile Institute, November 2014 (pdf)

What is the role played by private education in South Sudan, specifically in urban and peri-urban Juba? Are there differences between different types of private school? The study investigated the quantity of private schools, and their academic quality relative to government schools and amongst different types of private schools.

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Private Education in low-income areas of Monrovia: School and Household Surveys by James Tooley and David Longfield, E.G. West Centre, Newcastle University and Development Initiatives Liberia Inc., November 2013 (pdf)

What is the role played by private education in Liberia, especially amongst the urban poor? Are there differences between different types of private school? The study investigated the quantity of public and private school provision and factors influencing school choice.

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Private Primary Education in Westrern Area, Sierra Leone by James Tooley and David Longfield , E.G. West Centre, Newcastle University and Peoples Education Association, September 2013 (pdf)

What is the role played by private education in Sierra Leone, especially amongst the urban poor? And are there differences between different types of private school? The study investigated the quantity of private schools, and their academic quality, relative both to government schools and amongst the different types of private schools.

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The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid in Education (pdf)

James Stanfield, E.G. West Centre Working Paper 2012

Abstract: Since the publication of The Global Education Industry (Tooley, 1999), a number of important developments have taken place in this emerging sector which help to shed further light on the changing role of the profit motive in the design and delivery of education in low income communities across the developing world.  This working paper will briefly examine the work of the late C.K. Prahalad and its relevance to education; the growth of chains of budget private schools; the development of ecosystems for wealth creation in education and finally the United Nations and its changing attitude towards the profit motive in education.

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A Case Study Looking at Aspects of Parental Choice in Five Schools in Ghana (pdf)

David Longfield, E.G. West Centre Working Paper 2012

Abstract: The research looks at the factors that parents say that they use when choosing one of the five case study schools in the northern suburbs of Accra. The six most common factors quoted by parents were, in order, (1) good academic standards and exam results, (2) the location of the school relative to the home, (3) the quality of English teaching, (4) the Christian basis for the education, (5) the school curriculum and (6) the size of the classes.

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Education for All by 2015: A Freedom Based Approach (pdf)

James Stanfield,  E.G. West Centre Working Paper 2010

Abstract: The prevailing consensus within the international community on how to achieve education for all, or universal access to education, is based upon what is commonly referred to as the rights-based approach.  This consensus is now being challenged by widespread government failure and the remarkable growth of private schools for the poor across the developing world.  In order to achieve education for all in the 21st century a new freedom based approach is recommended.

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Self Help and Sustainability in Education in Developing Countries (pdf)

James Stanfield,  E.G. West Centre Working Paper 2010

Abstract: The last two decades have witnessed a rapid growth of fee paying private schools serving low income communities across the developing world. Not only have these schools emerged without any government help or assistance but they also continue to grow and develop in sometimes hostile regulatory environments. Furthermore, they also appear to outperform their public counterparts at a fraction of the cost. These developments therefore present international donors with a number of new opportunities and challenges concerning how best to encourage the spirit of self help in education and support the growth of private schools without undermining their independence or sustainability. These developments will be discussed in relation to the work of Elinor Ostrom and C.K. Prahalad.

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The Hidden Costs and Unintended Consequences of Government Intervention in the UK Higher Education Sector (pdf)

James Stanfield,  E.G. West Centre Working Paper 2008

Abstract: This working paper examines what is seen and what is not seen in the UK higher education sector. In contrast to the conventional wisdom, there is no compelling evidence to suggest that public subsidies to higher education have any economic benefit. Moreover, once its hidden costs and unintended consequences are taken into account, government intervention in higher education is doing far more harm than good, and is holding back the development of one of the UK’s most important service sectors.

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Is Private Education Good for the Poor? (pdf)

James Tooley, E.G. West Centre Working Paper 2005

Abstract:  Many believe that the private sector has little to offer in terms of reaching the Millennium Development Goal of ‘education for all’ by 2015. Private education is often assumed to be concerned only with serving the elite or middle classes, not the poor. What is the nature and extent of private education for the poor? This working paper outlines how private schools can play an important role in reaching the poor and satisfying their educational needs.

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Private Schools Serving the Poor: A Study from Delhi, India (pdf)

James Tooley & Pauline Dixon, E.G. West Centre Working Paper 2005